Assessment Analysis
2. Assessment Analysis : Students will collect literacy assessment data from their own classrooms. Students who are not currently working in classrooms may use publicly accessible data. Data over time is helpful (e.g., first and second semester scores, last year’s and this year’s scores, etc.). Assessment data might include, but is not limited to: Beginning-of-the-year inventories; Reading benchmark scores; Language arts/grammar pre-assessments; Spelling or vocabulary test scores; STAR CST test results, etc. Create a data display, such as a table or chart that is appropriate for group dialogue and analysis. Data might be organized as: a class chart of test results broken down by test question types, a school data sheet of class results broken into subgroups, or other formal or informal documentation of student scores. Bring your data display to class for a Preliminary Review of Data Display on September 24, 2015. In class small groups will analyze your students’ scores for trends including strengths, weaknesses, and apparent misconceptions. Following the in-class discussion, write a 1-2 page analysis of your literacy assessment data. Include a full description of what the data purport to show (e.g., reading comprehension) and the nature of the assessment (e.g., timed writing to a prompt; 30 multiple choice questions). Turn in your data display with your analysis for a Final Data Analysis and Display .
Guidelines for Final Data Analysis and Display
This assignment requires the collection of literacy assessment data from your own classrooms. Students who are not currently working in classrooms may use publicly accessible data. Data over time is helpful (e.g., first and second semester scores, last year’s and this year’s scores, etc.). Assessment data might include, but is not limited to: Beginning-of-the-year inventories; Reading benchmark scores; Language arts/grammar pre-assessments; Spelling or vocabulary test scores; STAR CST test results, etc. Create a data display, such as a table or chart that is appropriate for group dialogue and analysis. Data might be organized as: a class chart of test results broken down by test question types, a school data sheet of class results broken into subgroups, or other formal or informal documentation of student scores. Analyze your students’ scores for trends including strengths, weaknesses, and apparent misconceptions. Following the in-class discussion, write a 1-2 page analysis of your literacy assessment data. Include a full description of what the data purport to show (e.g., reading comprehension) and the nature of the assessment (e.g., timed writing to a prompt; 30 multiple choice questions). Send a copy via email to your instructor, bring a hard copy to class, and post a copy on Blackboard of your Final Data Analysis and Display.
1. Begin by stating Purpose of the Analysis, Demographics of the Students, and Methods Used in Data Collection.
2. Include Statement of the Problem, Background of the Problem, and Importance of the Problem.
3. Write a meaningful introduction to your table(s) and give your table(s) a specific title that states its content. Then, draw your table and display your assessment data. Next, explain the contents of your table without making any conclusions. Finally, write a critical analysis of the assessment data grounded in theory and philosophy. Describe where you stand in regard to important educational theories and practices relevant to curriculum design. Explain from your perspective what is the role of student; role of teacher (What kind of knowledge and skills do you believe is most important for students, and how should they gain that knowledge and those skills? What will be your role in that process?), and role of community. Discuss all implications, recommendations, and make a strong conclusion reiterating your philosophical/theoretical orientations. Your Data Analysis Display must have a conclusion that reflects your own approach to learning and instruction. It should be based on your personal beliefs that should show an influence of your readings and reflections.
4. Your Data Analysis Display does not have a cover page. Name/Title/Date should appear in the running head.
Guiding questions (Do not copy the questions – answer them within text):
a) How could the curriculum be modified based on your findings to meet the needs of the diverse students in your classroom?
b) What are your beliefs about how students learn, achieve, accomplish, feel, etc.?
c) How could your beliefs affect curriculum design/implementation, teaching/learning?
d) How can you balance the needs of the individual learner based on the data you analyzed?
e) What are your goals for students after analyzing the data? How can they best be met?
f) What is (should be) your relationship with the community, parents, teaching colleagues, or administration?
1. Use perfect grammar, spelling, punctuation, and sentence structure.
a. Write complete sentences.
b. Use only one idea for each paragraph and be sure to provide a transition between paragraphs. Use topic sentences.
c. Avoid using jargon, slang and contractions.
2. Your conclusion should provide a logical ending to your paper.
3. Avoid being redundant in your writing.
4. Avoid broad generalizations.
5. Your analysis should be positive.
6. HAVE SOMEONE REVIEW YOUR WORK.

"Are you looking for this answer? We can Help click Order Now"

UK BEST WRITING