Provide a critique of culture
Bergson, from Creative Evolution 1907, 141-144
In his argument towards the aspect of matter and memory, Bergson seems to support the ideologies created by Plato also known as Platonism. He argues that for free will to unfold, it is imperative to let it unfold in an autonomous way. There reason for this is that freedom is born of free will, which does not follow the conventions of time and space. Based on a bourgeois society, Marx believed that it is possible to control freedom.
Marinetti, “The Foundation and Manifesto of Futurism” 1909, 146-149
As one of the authors of the Manifesto of Futurism, Marinetti thought that it was immensely wise to do away with old culture as it was marred by societal evils. Together with part of his adherents they stressed the beauty of modernism. This concept is at the zenith of Marx’s principles mainly because Marxism was all about revolutionizing the society in preparation for the future.
Duchamp, “The Richard Mutt Case” 1917, 252
In his philosophical arguments, Duchamp helps in answering the pertinent question of art and how its idealistic nature can be determined. After assimilating futurism and cubism, this philosopher argued that anything produced in mass every day is also known as ‘readymade’ and this action had implications. None of Marx’s ideologies resonate with those held by Duchamp, but they share the same ideas on futurism.
Tristan Tzara, “Dada Manifesto 1918”, 252-257
This philosopher was part of the nihilistic movement known as DADAism that was created in the presence of tumultuous activities. Considering that at this point the society was beleaguered by the structures of language, Tristan worked extremely hard to rebuild Marxism and futurism. Apparently, Marxism was particularly responsible for viewing things in a realistic and surreal way.
Blok, “The Decline of Humanism” 1918, 263-265
Using a variety of enigmatic poems containing mystical features, Blok held on to the ideology first created by Viktor Shklovsky. He remains imbued with the idea that humanism was at its end and people were becoming less civilized. Considering that Marx espoused his theory from socialism, his ideologies are against those of Blok.
Rothko, “The Romantics Were Prompted …” 1947, 571-573
Using the heavy influence of mythology, he maintained and depicted the aspects of social revolution in his artwork. Through this, it was evident that Rothko strongly supported the idea of total freedom. Marx was not particularly inclined to the idea of total freedom and therefore there were minimal similarities between him and Rothko.

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Provide a critique of culture
Bergson, from Creative Evolution 1907, 141-144
In his argument towards the aspect of matter and memory, Bergson seems to support the ideologies created by Plato also known as Platonism. He argues that for free will to unfold, it is imperative to let it unfold in an autonomous way. There reason for this is that freedom is born of free will, which does not follow the conventions of time and space. Based on a bourgeois society, Marx believed that it is possible to control freedom.
Marinetti, “The Foundation and Manifesto of Futurism” 1909, 146-149
As one of the authors of the Manifesto of Futurism, Marinetti thought that it was immensely wise to do away with old culture as it was marred by societal evils. Together with part of his adherents they stressed the beauty of modernism. This concept is at the zenith of Marx’s principles mainly because Marxism was all about revolutionizing the society in preparation for the future.
Duchamp, “The Richard Mutt Case” 1917, 252
In his philosophical arguments, Duchamp helps in answering the pertinent question of art and how its idealistic nature can be determined. After assimilating futurism and cubism, this philosopher argued that anything produced in mass every day is also known as ‘readymade’ and this action had implications. None of Marx’s ideologies resonate with those held by Duchamp, but they share the same ideas on futurism.
Tristan Tzara, “Dada Manifesto 1918”, 252-257
This philosopher was part of the nihilistic movement known as DADAism that was created in the presence of tumultuous activities. Considering that at this point the society was beleaguered by the structures of language, Tristan worked extremely hard to rebuild Marxism and futurism. Apparently, Marxism was particularly responsible for viewing things in a realistic and surreal way.
Blok, “The Decline of Humanism” 1918, 263-265
Using a variety of enigmatic poems containing mystical features, Blok held on to the ideology first created by Viktor Shklovsky. He remains imbued with the idea that humanism was at its end and people were becoming less civilized. Considering that Marx espoused his theory from socialism, his ideologies are against those of Blok.
Rothko, “The Romantics Were Prompted …” 1947, 571-573
Using the heavy influence of mythology, he maintained and depicted the aspects of social revolution in his artwork. Through this, it was evident that Rothko strongly supported the idea of total freedom. Marx was not particularly inclined to the idea of total freedom and therefore there were minimal similarities between him and Rothko.

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UK BEST WRITING