shifting tides of war

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The shifting tides of war
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The Shifting Tides of War ( 0 messages – 0 unread )
Most authors agree that the predominate nature of war has changed over the last few decades, but why? Hide Full Description
As noted by Harbom and Wallensteen (2009), the nature of conflict has changed over the last few decades. Interstate war is on the decline, and intrastate war is occurring more and more frequently. Which authors from this week’s reading seem to best be able to explain this shift, and why?
All three required posts should be supported by course readings using parenthetical references.
Video Lecture
https://www.uctv.tv/shows/Armed-Conflict-The-Cost-to-Civilians-with-Ambassador-Jan-Eliasson-16025 This week we hear from Ambassador Jan Eliasson, the former Special Envoy of the U.N. Secretary-General for Darfur and also the former U.N. Under-Secretary-General for Humanitarian Affairs, on the cost of armed conflict on civilians. He gave the following talk at the Joan B. Kroc Institute for Peace and Justice on March 25, 2009.
Readings
Scholars have been noticing a striking decline in interstate war in the post-Cold War period along with a corresponding rise in intrastate conflict. Wallensteen has been actively reporting on the state of armed conflict for a number of years in the Journal of Peace Research, and the most recent available article is below:
Harbom, Lotta and Peter Wallensteen. 2009. Armed conflicts, 1946-2008. Journal of Peace Research 46, no. 4: 577-587.
The final three readings for this week propose a variety of reasons for war. Huntington sees civilizational conflict as the future for international relations, while Mueller argues that much of the current conflict in the world could be stopped with reasonable policing. Finally, the Maoz chapter reviews popular wisdom regarding the causes of conflict and provides a scientific assessment of these reasons. As you read Maoz, avoid getting hung up in his statistics. Focus on his written conclusions.
Huntington, Samuel P. 1993. The clash of civilizations. Foreign Affairs (Summer): 22-49.
Mueller, John. 2000. The banality of `ethnic war’. International Security 25, no. 1: 42-70.
Maoz, Zeev. 2004. “Statesmen, popular wisdom, and empirical realities in the study of conflict and war: extending the ‘Predictors of War in History and in the State of the World Message’” in Scourge of War: New Extensions of an Old Problem, edited by Paul Diehl, 63-93. Ann Arbor, MI: University of Michigan Press.
Check out the International Crisis Group’s interactive map for an update on the most significant situations of conflict or potential conflict around the world.
Order Description
What is your opinion on this?
The Shifting Tides of War ( 0 messages – 0 unread )
Most authors agree that the predominate nature of war has changed over the last few decades, but why? Hide Full Description
As noted by Harbom and Wallensteen (2009), the nature of conflict has changed over the last few decades. Interstate war is on the decline, and intrastate war is occurring more and more frequently. Which authors from this week’s reading seem to best be able to explain this shift, and why?
All three required posts should be supported by course readings using parenthetical references.
Video Lecture
https://www.uctv.tv/shows/Armed-Conflict-The-Cost-to-Civilians-with-Ambassador-Jan-Eliasson-16025 This week we hear from Ambassador Jan Eliasson, the former Special Envoy of the U.N. Secretary-General for Darfur and also the former U.N. Under-Secretary-General for Humanitarian Affairs, on the cost of armed conflict on civilians. He gave the following talk at the Joan B. Kroc Institute for Peace and Justice on March 25, 2009.
Readings
Scholars have been noticing a striking decline in interstate war in the post-Cold War period along with a corresponding rise in intrastate conflict. Wallensteen has been actively reporting on the state of armed conflict for a number of years in the Journal of Peace Research, and the most recent available article is below:
Harbom, Lotta and Peter Wallensteen. 2009. Armed conflicts, 1946-2008. Journal of Peace Research 46, no. 4: 577-587.
The final three readings for this week propose a variety of reasons for war. Huntington sees civilizational conflict as the future for international relations, while Mueller argues that much of the current conflict in the world could be stopped with reasonable policing. Finally, the Maoz chapter reviews popular wisdom regarding the causes of conflict and provides a scientific assessment of these reasons. As you read Maoz, avoid getting hung up in his statistics. Focus on his written conclusions.
Huntington, Samuel P. 1993. The clash of civilizations. Foreign Affairs (Summer): 22-49.
Mueller, John. 2000. The banality of `ethnic war’. International Security 25, no. 1: 42-70.
Maoz, Zeev. 2004. “Statesmen, popular wisdom, and empirical realities in the study of conflict and war: extending the ‘Predictors of War in History and in the State of the World Message’” in Scourge of War: New Extensions of an Old Problem, edited by Paul Diehl, 63-93. Ann Arbor, MI: University of Michigan Press.
Check out the International Crisis Group’s interactive map for an update on the most significant situations of conflict or potential conflict around the world.

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