“When is a child at harm?”
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“When is a child at harm?”
http://www.theage.com.au/federal-politics/protection-must-be-colour-blind-20090705-d97j.html
In critically analyzing the topic above, please draw from an epidemiological risk perspective, as well as from a least one other risk perspective to support your argument (i.e. consumer, social constructionist, or human rights perspective). Consider the role of social work in assessing risk in this area. You may focus on the issue broadly as the statement or question is currently written, or you may consider analysing a more specific experience within the topic (you might prefer to consider this in relation to a specific type of harm to children i.e. physical harm or neglect).
Assessment criteria: This essay will be marked according to your ability to:
• demonstrate your knowledge of the particular practice issue (child maltreatment ) from an epidemiological perspective
• demonstrate your knowledge of the particular practice issue from at least one other perspective (consumer, social constructionist, human rights)
• demonstrate your understanding of assessing risk in social work practice in relation to this issue
• explicitly use the relevant chapter from the core text in addition to other relevant literature to support your arguments. • express your ideas in a coherent and scholarly manner
• use relevant references appropriately (APA 6 th).
Readings
Assessment and/or models of coping and adaptation:
DHS Best Interests Series athttp://www.dhs.vic.gov.au/__data/assets/pdf_file/0008/589643/cyf_best_interests_case_practice_model_summary_guide_09_12.pdf- Full document
* Child and Family Snapshot from DHS Victoria accessible at:http://www.dhs.vic.gov.au/__data/assets/pdf_file/0006/590667/cyf_child_and_family_snapshot_practitioner_field_tool_genograms_2012.pdf
Christopherson, R. (1998). Social work students’ perceptions of child abuse: An international comparison and postmodern interpretation of its findings. British Journal of Social Work, 28(1), 57-72.
Social work practice:
* Connolly, M. & Cashmore, J. (2013). Child welfare practice. In Connolly, M. & Harms, L. (Eds). Social work: Contexts and practice (3rd ed.) (258-272). South Melbourne: Oxford University Press.
Scott, D. (2013). Early intervention with families of vulnerable children. In Connolly, M. & Harms, L. (Eds). Social work: Contexts and practice (3rd ed.) (247-257). South Melbourne: Oxford University Press.
O’Brien, M. (2013). Social work, poverty and disadvantage. In Connolly, M. & Harms, L. (Eds). Social work: Contexts and practice (3rd ed.) (74-86). South Melbourne: Oxford University Press.
Fernandez, E. (2005). The challenge of child protection. In Alston, M., & McKinnon, J. (eds.). Fields of social work practice (2nd ed.). South Melbourne: Oxford University Press. Chapter 14, 176-193.
Long, M. &Sephton, R. (2011). Rethinking the ‘best interests’ of the child: Voices from Aboriginal child and family welfare practitioners. Australian Social Work, 64(1), 96-112.
Mason, J. (2005). Social work with families. In Alston, M., & McKinnon, J. (eds.). Fields of social work practice (2nd ed.). South Melbourne: Oxford University Press. Chapter 7, 83-94.
Consumer perspectives:
Morrison, Z. (2007). Caring about sexual assault: The effects of sexual assault on families, and the effects on victim/survivors of family responses to sexual assault, Family Matters, 76, 55-63.
Epidemiological perspectives:
Appleyard, K., Egeland, B., van Dulmen, M., & Sroufe, A. (2005). When more is not better: The role of cumulative risk in child behaviour outcomes. Journal of Child Psychology and Psychiatry, 46(3), 235-245
Serbin, L. & Karp, J. (2004). The intergenerational transfer of psychosocial risk: Mediators of vulnerability and resilience. Annual Review of Psychology, 55, 333-363.
Department of Human Services (2013). Victoria’s vulnerable children baseline performance data report 2013 available at: http://www.dhs.vic.gov.au/about-the-department/documents-and-resources/research,-data-and-statistics/victorias-vulnerable-children–our-shared-responsibility-performance-data-reports
Social construction:
MacLeod, A. (2009). Protection must be colour blind. The Age, July 6. http://www.theage.com.au/federal-politics/protection-must-be-colour-blind-20090705-d97j.html

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