Writing to inform | Oxbridge Essays

Essays are written to inform. Essentially, the written material that you provide conveys information from you, the writer/author to other persons, usually a professor or instructor, and sometimes peers and colleagues. Even the loosest of writing projects, like the personal essay or creative non-fiction assignments, are responsible for a transfer of information. What many new writers do not understand, and despite low marks, some are never informed or ever realise, that all academic writing hangs on the presentation of clear and accurate information. The vast majority of essays are written to inform. These essays can be used to inform readers on seemingly factual information; the life cycle of a fruit-fly, for instance. But even a writing prompt that involves taking a position (e.g. ‘what is your view of Brexit?’ or ‘Coffee in the morning: how much is too much?’) makes an underlying request for information. So, what can you Read More …

Writing to inform | Oxbridge Essays

Essays are written to inform. Essentially, the written material that you provide conveys information from you, the writer/author to other persons, usually a professor or instructor, and sometimes peers and colleagues. Even the loosest of writing projects, like the personal essay or creative non-fiction assignments, are responsible for a transfer of information. What many new writers do not understand, and despite low marks, some are never informed or ever realise, that all academic writing hangs on the presentation of clear and accurate information. The vast majority of essays are written to inform. These essays can be used to inform readers on seemingly factual information; the life cycle of a fruit-fly, for instance. But even a writing prompt that involves taking a position (e.g. ‘what is your view of Brexit?’ or ‘Coffee in the morning: how much is too much?’) makes an underlying request for information. So, what can you Read More …

How to conclude your essay well

You may be surprised when we say that an essay conclusion is, in some ways, comparable to a piece of text as emotive as say, Martin Luther King’s “I Have a Dream” speech. Sounds ridiculous? Perhaps. But, extravagant comparisons aside, what we mean here is that the core purpose of an essay conclusion can be compared to the end of any great speech, monologue or presentation that leaves you feeling something. Ultimately, when you conclude an essay, you want to engage the reader’s emotions, whether they be excitement, surprise, contemplation, or a mix of these and more. And you want to do this in much the same way that Martin Luther King would have done with his captivated audience on that memorable day in 1963. Conclusions are among the hardest parts of an essay to write well. You need to round off your essay effectively. You need to leave your Read More …

8 tips for great essay writing

The Internet is awash with not-so-helpful essay writing advice, making it tricky for students to find the advice they need when writing essays. So our academic experts have written the following tips for you to utilise before and whilst crafting your essay, to ensure your writing hits the mark. Understand the question This may, at the face of it, sound like somewhat banal advice – but fact of the matter is that failing to properly understand the question set is one of, if not the most common reason behind a disappointing grade when it comes to essay writing. Are you being asked to critically evaluate something? Compare and contrast? Analyse a particular circumstance? Evaluate the usefulness of a particular concept? These are some of the common phrases found in essay questions, and each indicates a different set of expectations. If you are Read More …