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Have you noticed your child making excuses not to go to school on those days when he has math? Have you noticed a decrease in his exam grades? Do you ever see them doing any math homework at home?

If not, these could all be signs that your child is finding math difficult and is doing everything possible to avoid it.

You could start by showing a casual interest in their homework books. A visit to school to speak to their teacher should shed a good light on whether your child is finding math difficult. Many 8th grade math students find the jump in the type of math taught to be a lot more different to the math they were doing in earlier years. Percentages, decimals and fractions and well as numbers with exponents can look extremely complicated to children who have been used to dealing with the good old fashioned whole numbers and doing math questions that involved addition, subtraction, multiplication and division.

Not all parents have the time or the inclination, and often, the patience and ability to teach 8th grade math to their kids in a way that will help their children to improve their math scores. If this is the situation you are in, a way around it would be to find a good online math learning environment that encompasses the math modules your child is covering at school presently.

Look for qualified teaching staff, good, visual, clear online tutorials and examples and step-by-step problem solving which would be easy for your child to follow. Look for examples which clearly demonstrate the principles taught in the lesson. Sometimes, these online learning programs will have free tutorials you can get access to. These are invaluable as they allow you to see the style of teaching before you make a commitment to subscribe.

Another option would be to find a math tutor nearby who would be willing to tutor your child. The good thing about finding someone near your home is that you won’t be spending a lot of time or petrol driving your child to and from the tutors house. All these might seem like little inconsequential costs but they tend to add up over time and, when included with the cost of having a personal tutor on a weekly basis, you’ll find yourself paying out a lot of money in an effort to raise your child’s trigonometry and geometry grades.

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