UWP 101: Fall 2016, Professor Liz Constable

Week One Reading Reflection Prompt

 

FOR YOUR READING REFLECTION DUE ON SmartSite, uploaded as a WORD doc to the SmartSite Assignment Prompt by Sunday September 25th, by 6 pm, you need to think about the following questions and write up a reading reflection of 250 – 500 words

 

In class on Monday, we’ll discuss all four of the readings you’re studying this weekend by the following authors: Mike Rose, Anne Lamott, Linda Flower, and then the longer essay by Vivian Gornick.

 

STEPS TO FOLLOW

If any of all of these writers is unfamiliar to you, your first task is to look up the author, and find out a little about the work they do as writers; their context or situation; values or objectives that guide their work as writers; what gives them the authority to be writers I feel confident you can learn with.

 

Then, keep in mind the questions to ask yourself from the Guidelines to Reading as a Writer (in the Handouts Folder in RESOURCES on SS), and jot down notes about your sense of each writer’s purpose in writing; the role each writer adopts in the piece you’re reading; and the intended audience (who is the writer addressing in each piece?). Make notes about points you disagree with, and think about why you disagree. Monitor your feelings and reactions as you read a piece. Note down how you feel about the writer and their ideas as they emerge from the text. If you like, or dislike, a text, be sure to be able to explain in specific ways WHAT you like, or dislike.

 

FOR YOUR READING REFLECTION DUE ON SmartSite, uploaded as a WORD doc to the SmartSite Assignment Prompt by Sunday September 25th, by 6 pm, you need to think about the following questions and write up a reading reflection of 250 – 500 words.  This week’s Reading Reflection asks you to respond on Vivian Gornick’s “The Situation and the Story.” Use the questions as simple goads to catalyze your thinking and writing, and write up your response as continuous prose, not responses to each question 😉

 

  • Pay attention to the strategy Gornick uses to open her essay. How does she lead us into her essay? Do you like it? Would you adopt this strategy?

 

  • Gornick ponders why one particular speaker (eulogist) produced such a moving and intense effect on her. To what does Gornick attribute this? What does she think makes the one speaker so effective?

 

  • What does Gornick mean when she writes that “The persona in a nonfiction narrative is an unsurrogated one” (7)?

 

  • In Gornick’s view, what are the responsibilities of the narrator/persona of non-fiction? Select a sentence that clarifies this for you.

 

  • What does Gornick consider to be some of the dangers of non-fiction writing? Or, in her mind, what type of non-fiction writing isn’t successful? Do you agree? What is essential for non-fiction writing to be effective in her view?

 

  • Why are the two terms (situation and story) so important to Gornick’s discussion of non-fiction writing? What do you think of her distinction between the two aspects of non-fiction writing? Can this distinction be helpful to you as you prepare to write about your own experience for Assignment #1?

 

  • Write out at least one sentence that encapsulates a thought or idea that you want to remember. Explain your choice.

 

  • Write out at least one sentence that strikes you as well written (because of language choice, or structure, or . . .). Explain why this sentence stood out for you.