Pesonalities I Admire: Bertrand Russell

[purchase_link id=”25524″ text=”Purchase” style=”button” color=”orange”] Bertrand Arthur William Russell (b.1872 – d.1970) was a British philosopher, logician, essayist and social critic best known for his work in mathematical logic and analytic philosophy. His most influential contributions include his defense of logicism (the view that mathematics is in some important sense reducible to logic), his refining of the predicate calculus introduced by Gottlob Frege (which still forms the basis of most contemporary logic), his defense of neutral monism (the view that the world consists of just one type of substance that is neither exclusively mental nor exclusively physical), and his theories of definite descriptions and logical atomism. Along withG.E. Moore, Russell is generally recognized as one of the founders of modern analytic philosophy. Along with Kurt Gödel, he is regularly credited with being one of the most important logicians of the twentieth century. Over the course of his long career, Russell Read More …

The Christian Challenge: The Druids, The Templars and The Woman Pope

[purchase_link id=”25524″ text=”Purchase” style=”button” color=”orange”] by W H Uffington Ten years ago I began a story based on the historical King Arthur. I wanted to start the book with Joseph of Arimathea bringing the young Jesus to Britain, so that I could show how Celtic beliefs might have influenced Jesus, whose in turn eventually influenced Arthur. I immersed myself in Celtic history and mythology but once I looked at early Christianity I found something that shook me to the core. I came across a book called The Jesus Mysteries, which told me that Jesus was a myth and the Christianity I grew up with was a lie. These revelations hit me hard, I was shocked and stunned and felt betrayed. I felt a rage at the Church’s deliberate lies, for someone must have known the truth, and even worse, I felt fury at the way unscrupulous people had used religion Read More …

In our Daily Life Quotations are so Essential

[purchase_link id=”25524″ text=”Purchase” style=”button” color=”orange”] Use quotations at strategically selected moments. You have probably been told by teachers to provide as much evidence as possible in support of your thesis. But packing your paper with quotations will not necessarily strengthen your argument. The majority of your paper should still be your original ideas in your own words (after all, it’s your paper). And quotations are only one type of evidence: well-balanced papers may also make use of paraphrases, data, and statistics. The types of evidence you use will depend in part on the conventions of the discipline or audience for which you are writing. For example, papers analyzing literature may rely heavily on direct quotations of the text, while papers in the social sciences may have more paraphrasing, data, and statistics than quotations. 1. Discussing specific arguments or ideas.Sometimes, in order to debate with clarity and specificity the ideas of Read More …

Writing a Great Novel-The Secret Every Writer Needs to Know

[purchase_link id=”25524″ text=”Purchase” style=”button” color=”orange”] There’s nothing more important to writing a successful novel than identifying the key problem of the story. This article shows how easy it is. Every writer wants to write a great novel, but not every writer knows the secret that can make the difference between a successful novel and a failure. The secret that every writer needs to know is that every novel is a mystery. I know that might sound ridiculous at first, especially if you’re writing a romance or a science fiction novel. At their core, though, even westerns and horror stories are mysteries. Let me explain what I mean. When I say that every novel is a mystery, I mean that there is something (a mystery) that the main character must figure out during the story. In a murder mystery, this is pretty obvious. The main character must figure out who committed Read More …