Climate Change and Human Health

Climate Change and Human Health

Climate Change and Human Health

Climate change is primarily the difference we experience in the climate due to different activities carried out by human kind. Climate change has become a significant and emerging threat to public health, and we must consider protecting the vulnerable populations. In the underdeveloped countries, the effect of climate change on the health of people is more negative than in the developed countries. The future for generations in the future will highly depend on the way we look at the climate today and what measures we set up to ensure safe living (Hall, 2007).

According to my country (Israel), the problem arising from climate change affects the whole country and the world at large. The issue is critical since the dangers of global warming, carbon (IV) oxide emissions and environmental degradation has proved to be the main contributors of climate degradation. Global warming contributes to the degradation of the ozone layer hence leading to exposure of humankind to cancer causing sun rays. The carbon (IV) oxide emissions as well contribute to the degradation. The World Health Organization has put in place various measures to ensure that all people are free from the effects of changing climate. It has programmes that work on improving the way we look at health hazards that come with climate change. Through its country offices, the objectives put depend on the environmental requirements.

The main purpose of the Organization is to provide the health-sector a voice within the overall UN. The response of the UN to climate change has also been supportive in ensuring a healthy living among people. However, the UN should endorse the effects of climate change on developing countries as part of its resolutions.

There have been a number of proposed solutions to the whole issue of climate change by UN. One of the greatest developments in Israel is the carbon credit programme. This programme encourages the community to grow trees to improve the environment. The “go green” initiative has put this programme to use and its working out well. The carbon credit programme considers the number of trees planted and cared for over time. In Israel, the carbon emitting industries have certain charges in the form of money which is for compensating those working in the programme -planting the trees. From a good point of view, the trees are a crucial part of the climate, and if this programme works out well, it should be able to transform the issue of climate change and especially human health for the better.

Some of the health effects may pose a challenge ahead if there is an increase in mere intense weather conditions continues. Changing temperatures leading to cold seasons and heat waves may lead to diseases such as hypothermia. These diseases may also lead to death (McMichael 2003). Research has shown that mortality increases during hot days among the extremely old and particularly young people (Oxfam Report, (2009).

These problems should be addressed by considering the information collected from the field and not necessarily relying on public and political based information. If any resources are to be given out for the management and control of these issues, it should also be done on the bases of country’s dependency on the external resources. Also, the index of resource management ought to ensure that no resources are put to waste whatsoever (Apfel, 2001). The gap between the developed and under develop countries ought to be kept at a minimum so as to ensure that no country is taking advantage of the other. The developed countries should have the feeling that, it is their personal duty to ensure that the developing ones attain the same health, and climate standards as themselves.

In conclusion, the future of the world and the developing countries in particular will depend on the basis of support they will accord each other. Overpopulation should also not be overlooked in the process of addressing the climate change and human health matter.

References

Apfel, Bettina Menne. Protecting Health in Europe from Climate Change. (WHO) New York: Knopf, 2008.Print.

Githeko, J.D. scherzo and A. Woodward. Climate change and human health – risks and responses. New York: Oxford, 2003.Print.

Lucas R, Ponsonby A. Ultraviolet radiation effects and health: friend and foe. NJ: Peterson’s,2002; 177. Print.

McMichael, D. Campbell-Lendrum, C. Corvallis, K.L. Obi, Hypothermia effects in cold climate. New York: McGraw-Hill, 1999. Print.

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