Activity Plan Assignment

This assessment is used in every section of EDU 119
Assessment 1: EDU 119 Assignment Overview
EDU 119 Activity Planning project
This assignment meets the following NAEYC Standards:
NAEYC Standard 1: Promoting Child Development and Learning
Students prepared in early childhood degree pro­grams are grounded in a child development knowl­edge base. They use their understanding of young children’s characteristics and needs and of the multiple interacting influences on children’s devel­opment and learning to create environments that are healthy, respectful, supportive, and challenging for each child.
Key Elements of Standard 1
1b: Knowing and understanding the multiple influ­ences on development and learning
1c: Using developmental knowledge to create healthy, respectful, supportive, and challenging learning environments

NAEYC Standard 3: Observing, Documenting and Assessing to Support Young Children and Families
Students prepared in early childhood degree pro­grams understand that child observation, docu­mentation, and other forms of assessment are central to the practice of all early childhood pro­fessionals. They know about and understand the goals, benefits, and uses of assessment. They know about and use systematic observations, documen­tation, and other effective assessment strategies in a responsible way, in partnership with families and other professionals, to positively influence the development of every child.

Key Elements of Standard 3
3a: Understanding the goals, benefits, and uses of assessment
3b: Knowing about assessment partnerships with families and with professional colleagues
3c: Knowing about and using observation, docu­mentation, and other appropriate assessment tools and approaches
3d: Understanding and practicing responsible assessment to promote positive outcomes for each child

NAEYC Standard 4: Using Developmentally Effective Approaches to Connect with Children and Families
Students prepared in early childhood degree pro­grams understand that teaching and learning with young children is a complex enterprise, and its details vary depending on children’s ages, char­acteristics, and the settings within which teach­ing and learning occur. They understand and use positive relationships and supportive interactions as the foundation for their work with young chil­dren and families. Students know, understand, and use a wide array of developmentally appropriate approaches, instructional strategies, and tools to connect with children and families and positively influence each child’s development and learning.
Key Element of Standard 4
4c: Using a broad repertoire of developmentally appropriate teaching/learning approaches

NAEYC Standard 5: Using Content Knowledge to Build Meaningful Curriculum
Students prepared in early childhood degree pro­grams use their knowledge of academic disciplines to design, implement, and evaluate experiences that promote positive development and learning for each and every young child. Students under­stand the importance of developmental domains and academic (or content) disciplines in an early childhood curriculum. They know the essential concepts, inquiry tools, and structure of con­tent areas, including academic subjects, and can identify resources to deepen their understand­ing. Students use their own knowledge and other resources to design, implement, and evaluate meaningful, challenging curricula that promote comprehensive developmental and learning out­comes for every young child.
Key Elements of Standard 5
5a: Understanding content knowledge and resources in academic disciplines
5b: Knowing and using the central concepts, inquiry tools, and structures of content areas or academic disciplines
5c: Using their own knowledge, appropriate early learning standards, and other resources to design, implement, and evaluate meaningful, challenging curricula for each child

NAEYC Supportive Skill
3. Written and Verbal Communication skills
4. Skills in making connections between prior knowledge/experience and new learning
5. Skills in identifying and using professional resources

Assignment Overview:
Develop two (2) activity plans, one (1) for each of the following age groups (Infant/Toddler and Pre-K).

Create an activity plan for children from each of the assigned age groups. The activities MUST be developmentally appropriate and encourage active exploration of materials and ideas. For the most part, the children should be able to do the activity with minimal guidance from their teachers, although teachers should interact with children, asking questions to encourage exploration, curiosity, problem solving, language development and deeper thinking. Dittos/coloring sheets, flash cards, product oriented projects, etc. will not be considered developmentally appropriate activities. The activities should be open-ended, encourage exploration, discovery, creativity and allow the children to build their own knowledge. These should also be planned for individual or small groups of children, not the entire class to do at the same time. They can (and should!!) take place in activity areas in the classroom or outside. Each plan should focus on a different area of development (Emotional and Social Development, Health and Physical Development, Approaches to Learning, Language Development and Communication, or Cognitive Development).

Each activity plan should include the following:

1) Title of the Activity and age of the children participating

2) Area of Development (Domain and Subdomain) (Emotional and Social Development, Health and Physical Development, Approaches to Learning, Language Development and Communication, or Cognitive Development) PLEASE CHOOSE ONLY ONE AREA.

3) Standard/Goal addressed (can also include indicator to be more specific) – This is what you want the children to learn from participating in the activity. It is also what you will be evaluating in section 6. If you do not have a standard listed, you cannot get points for section 3 or section 6, and only partial points for section 5. The age of the child for whom the activity is being planned will determine which document you will use to find the standard. For the Infant/Toddler or Preschool activity plans, you will need to refer to the North Carolina Foundations for Early Learning and Development. The link to this document will be given in class and can be found in the Course Documents tab of your Blackboard. Please list the page number as well as the standard worded EXACTLY as it is worded in the original document. You should list only ONE standard to be addressed in this activity.

For the Infant/Toddler or Preschool activity plans you will need to refer to Foundations: North Carolina Foundations for Early Learning and Development. Access them online at: http://ncchildcare.nc.gov/pdf_forms/NC_foundations.pdf

Please write the full Domain, Subdomain, Goal, and Indicator for example: Domain: Approaches to Play and Learning (APL), Subdomain: Curiosity, Information-Seeking, and Eagerness, Goal APL-1: Children show curiosity and express interest in the world around them, Indicator: Show curiosity abouttheir surroundings(with pointing, facialexpressions, words).APL-1

4) Materials – List all of the materials you will need to do the activity. Pretend that you are planning an activity for a substitute to do in your classroom. He or she will not be familiar with the activity, so you will have to state everything for them.

5) Procedures – Step-by-step instructions for doing the activity. Also include how many children will be doing the activity with you. If it is for one child put one child. These should always be for an individual or small group of children (5 preschoolers, 3 toddlers). Write down the questions you will ask the children to encourage them to think about their activity and guide them toward meeting the standard. Please be sure to include what THE CHILDREN will do in the activity. Watching you do an activity is not an open-ended activity for the children. Again, think of that substitute. If you don’t tell him or her exactly what to do, they will not be able to do the activity. Write down everything!

6) Assessment of children’s progress – How will you document the children’s progress in meeting the standard you chose to focus on in the activity? (Examples include: Anecdotal notes, pictures, videos, voice recordings, work samples, checklists, but please, NO TESTS!) Be sure the assessment method you choose matches the standard you have chosen. While taking pictures of a child cutting will document a child’s scissor skills, you can’t take a picture of a child asking for a turn. You will have to document this with anecdotal notes or a voice recording. Be sure to include WHAT you are looking for when you assess the child!

7) Family Involvement and assessment partnership. – think of ways that children’s families could be involved in the activity, how they might do this activity (or something similar) at home, or at the very least, how you will let them know that their child participated in the activity and what they learned from doing it. Suggest 3 opportunities for families to observe children working on this standard in the home environment (can be natural activities or routines such as meals, bed time routines, etc, or planned activities they do with their children). List how families can share their assessment of their children’s progress with the teacher; examples include family teacher conference, informal conversations regarding progress, family shared pictures, etc.

The attached rubric will be used to grade this assignment.
This assessment is used in every section of EDU 119
Assessment 1: EDU 119 Assignment Overview
EDU 119 Activity Planning project
This assignment meets the following NAEYC Standards:
NAEYC Standard 1: Promoting Child Development and Learning
Students prepared in early childhood degree pro­grams are grounded in a child development knowl­edge base. They use their understanding of young children’s characteristics and needs and of the multiple interacting influences on children’s devel­opment and learning to create environments that are healthy, respectful, supportive, and challenging for each child.
Key Elements of Standard 1
1b: Knowing and understanding the multiple influ­ences on development and learning
1c: Using developmental knowledge to create healthy, respectful, supportive, and challenging learning environments

NAEYC Standard 3: Observing, Documenting and Assessing to Support Young Children and Families
Students prepared in early childhood degree pro­grams understand that child observation, docu­mentation, and other forms of assessment are central to the practice of all early childhood pro­fessionals. They know about and understand the goals, benefits, and uses of assessment. They know about and use systematic observations, documen­tation, and other effective assessment strategies in a responsible way, in partnership with families and other professionals, to positively influence the development of every child.

Key Elements of Standard 3
3a: Understanding the goals, benefits, and uses of assessment
3b: Knowing about assessment partnerships with families and with professional colleagues
3c: Knowing about and using observation, docu­mentation, and other appropriate assessment tools and approaches
3d: Understanding and practicing responsible assessment to promote positive outcomes for each child

NAEYC Standard 4: Using Developmentally Effective Approaches to Connect with Children and Families
Students prepared in early childhood degree pro­grams understand that teaching and learning with young children is a complex enterprise, and its details vary depending on children’s ages, char­acteristics, and the settings within which teach­ing and learning occur. They understand and use positive relationships and supportive interactions as the foundation for their work with young chil­dren and families. Students know, understand, and use a wide array of developmentally appropriate approaches, instructional strategies, and tools to connect with children and families and positively influence each child’s development and learning.
Key Element of Standard 4
4c: Using a broad repertoire of developmentally appropriate teaching/learning approaches

NAEYC Standard 5: Using Content Knowledge to Build Meaningful Curriculum
Students prepared in early childhood degree pro­grams use their knowledge of academic disciplines to design, implement, and evaluate experiences that promote positive development and learning for each and every young child. Students under­stand the importance of developmental domains and academic (or content) disciplines in an early childhood curriculum. They know the essential concepts, inquiry tools, and structure of con­tent areas, including academic subjects, and can identify resources to deepen their understand­ing. Students use their own knowledge and other resources to design, implement, and evaluate meaningful, challenging curricula that promote comprehensive developmental and learning out­comes for every young child.
Key Elements of Standard 5
5a: Understanding content knowledge and resources in academic disciplines
5b: Knowing and using the central concepts, inquiry tools, and structures of content areas or academic disciplines
5c: Using their own knowledge, appropriate early learning standards, and other resources to design, implement, and evaluate meaningful, challenging curricula for each child

NAEYC Supportive Skill
3. Written and Verbal Communication skills
4. Skills in making connections between prior knowledge/experience and new learning
5. Skills in identifying and using professional resources

Assignment Overview:
Develop two (2) activity plans, one (1) for each of the following age groups (Infant/Toddler and Pre-K).

Create an activity plan for children from each of the assigned age groups. The activities MUST be developmentally appropriate and encourage active exploration of materials and ideas. For the most part, the children should be able to do the activity with minimal guidance from their teachers, although teachers should interact with children, asking questions to encourage exploration, curiosity, problem solving, language development and deeper thinking. Dittos/coloring sheets, flash cards, product oriented projects, etc. will not be considered developmentally appropriate activities. The activities should be open-ended, encourage exploration, discovery, creativity and allow the children to build their own knowledge. These should also be planned for individual or small groups of children, not the entire class to do at the same time. They can (and should!!) take place in activity areas in the classroom or outside. Each plan should focus on a different area of development (Emotional and Social Development, Health and Physical Development, Approaches to Learning, Language Development and Communication, or Cognitive Development).

Each activity plan should include the following:

1) Title of the Activity and age of the children participating

2) Area of Development (Domain and Subdomain) (Emotional and Social Development, Health and Physical Development, Approaches to Learning, Language Development and Communication, or Cognitive Development) PLEASE CHOOSE ONLY ONE AREA.

3) Standard/Goal addressed (can also include indicator to be more specific) – This is what you want the children to learn from participating in the activity. It is also what you will be evaluating in section 6. If you do not have a standard listed, you cannot get points for section 3 or section 6, and only partial points for section 5. The age of the child for whom the activity is being planned will determine which document you will use to find the standard. For the Infant/Toddler or Preschool activity plans, you will need to refer to the North Carolina Foundations for Early Learning and Development. The link to this document will be given in class and can be found in the Course Documents tab of your Blackboard. Please list the page number as well as the standard worded EXACTLY as it is worded in the original document. You should list only ONE standard to be addressed in this activity.

For the Infant/Toddler or Preschool activity plans you will need to refer to Foundations: North Carolina Foundations for Early Learning and Development. Access them online at: http://ncchildcare.nc.gov/pdf_forms/NC_foundations.pdf

Please write the full Domain, Subdomain, Goal, and Indicator for example: Domain: Approaches to Play and Learning (APL), Subdomain: Curiosity, Information-Seeking, and Eagerness, Goal APL-1: Children show curiosity and express interest in the world around them, Indicator: Show curiosity abouttheir surroundings(with pointing, facialexpressions, words).APL-1

4) Materials – List all of the materials you will need to do the activity. Pretend that you are planning an activity for a substitute to do in your classroom. He or she will not be familiar with the activity, so you will have to state everything for them.

5) Procedures – Step-by-step instructions for doing the activity. Also include how many children will be doing the activity with you. If it is for one child put one child. These should always be for an individual or small group of children (5 preschoolers, 3 toddlers). Write down the questions you will ask the children to encourage them to think about their activity and guide them toward meeting the standard. Please be sure to include what THE CHILDREN will do in the activity. Watching you do an activity is not an open-ended activity for the children. Again, think of that substitute. If you don’t tell him or her exactly what to do, they will not be able to do the activity. Write down everything!

6) Assessment of children’s progress – How will you document the children’s progress in meeting the standard you chose to focus on in the activity? (Examples include: Anecdotal notes, pictures, videos, voice recordings, work samples, checklists, but please, NO TESTS!) Be sure the assessment method you choose matches the standard you have chosen. While taking pictures of a child cutting will document a child’s scissor skills, you can’t take a picture of a child asking for a turn. You will have to document this with anecdotal notes or a voice recording. Be sure to include WHAT you are looking for when you assess the child!

7) Family Involvement and assessment partnership. – think of ways that children’s families could be involved in the activity, how they might do this activity (or something similar) at home, or at the very least, how you will let them know that their child participated in the activity and what they learned from doing it. Suggest 3 opportunities for families to observe children working on this standard in the home environment (can be natural activities or routines such as meals, bed time routines, etc, or planned activities they do with their children). List how families can share their assessment of their children’s progress with the teacher; examples include family teacher conference, informal conversations regarding progress, family shared pictures, etc.

The attached rubric will be used to grade this assignment.