Administration of the Contract or Grievances

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Administration of the Contract or Grievances

What is the most significant new information you learned in Chapter 10 regarding Administration of the Contract or
Grievances? How did this impact your previous perception of Contract Administration or Grievance Resolution in organizations?.
Respond to one of the following questions:
1. Develop a potential grievance scenario in your workplace or another environment with which you are familiar. Discuss why the grievance is being filed, how it may impact union and management interests and how it would play out in a “power” vs. an “empathetic” union management environment.
2. Should the “Golden Rules for the Union’s Duty to Fair Representation” of employees apply equally in a grievance based on violation of the contract as opposed to a grievance filed for an ulterior purpose? Explain your response. Do you feel there is merit in the union’s use of a grievance for ulterior purpose?
3. Respond to the questions at the end of Case 10-2 Must the Union Process the Grievance of a Non-union Member?
4. Respond to the questions at the end of Case 10-1 Are These Grievances Arbitrable? (Be the arbitrator in the last question.)
Part 2
Respond to the posts of two colleagues.
1)Moira Respond
What is the most significant new information you learned in Chapter 10 regarding Administration of the Contract or Grievances? How did this impact your previous perception of Contract Administration or Grievance Resolution in organizations?
I learned that a grievances are great for certain types of jobs because it opens a line of communication and it also might help institutionalize the problem by stopping the employee from sabotaging, initiating strikes or even quitting. However, in other cases if an employee were to file a grievance against their supervisor, there may be ill-will feelings towards this employee and the supervisor may even make the work harder on them. With the right team to analyze the situation, it will eliminate judgment against the person who is in the right as opposed to the person who just wants another easy way to make money. However, the process to file a grievance is much more intricate then one would think and it requires more steps to actually get the problem resolved.
2) Richard Respond
Chapter 10 – Islas
I found the Union’s Duty to Fair Representation obligation a bit strange. I do understand that each employee is entitled to “fairly and impartially” administer grievance processing and review, I did not know that the union has the obligation to provide that same level of grievance pressing for both union and non union workers. The union employees have elected to reside under the union umbrella of representation, as well as pay dues, fees, etc. The non union employees have chosen to NOT reside under the union umbrella of representation, thus pay no dues, fees, etc., but in fact get the same benefits under the grievance process. I would think that by electing to not be represented by the union, that the employee could then represent themselves with management. Even though the Labor-Management Relations Act (LMRA), offers both union and non union employees the same representation and protection from actions that are deemed arbitrary, discriminatory, and or in bad faith. Could the non union employee elect to represent themselves on issues of grievance with management, bypassing the union committees? I would hope so, but doubt it after read the LMRA statuses under the NLRB.
Part 3 HR 408 answer all question .

http://www.businessinsider.com/maternity-paternity-leave-policies-at-google-facebook-yahoo-twitter-microsoft-2013-8

1. Should both parents have the same amount of parental leave for a newborn or young child adoption? Why or Why not?

2. Should gay or lesbian parents be offered the same parental leave benefits as natural parents (for the non biological parents)?

3. Should women who give birth receive more consideration for parental leave due to the nature of child birth?
Part 4Respond to the posts of two colleagues.
1) Amielyn Respond
Does the Family and Medical Leave Act go far enough? Too far?
From my readings, I think the Family and Medical Leave Act go far enough to support employees to take leave due to medical reasons, to care of newborn/adopted child, and to care for family members due to a serious illness. The Family and Medical Leave Act permits for employees to be able to support their families when in need, and not have to choose to keep a career or care for family only. I believe the time allowed under this act is plenty enough. FMLA guarantees employees job protection. They are able to return back to their job after taking family or medical leave, without repercussions unless they were abusing the system. I think this is most beneficial for women because of maternity leave required after giving birth
2) Jennifer Respond
The Family and Medical Leave act does not go far enough because there are obvious gender biases in the provisions. A fellow classmate, Joseph Hawkins shared a valid perspective in his news analysis topic “Standing up for the rights of new fathers.” The article discussed the significant difference in the amount of time off allotted under the Act for parents of adopted and foster children versus biological fathers. FMLA should be revised to provide equal bonding time for both biological parents. The definition of “a serious health condition” needs further clarification in order to dissuade frivolous claims. Migraines, asthma, allergy symptoms, and joint pains are legitimate, common health conditions but are they serious enough to qualify under FMLA? If so, protection under the Act would include virtually all known illnesses.

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