Discuss how national and transnational approaches each have valuable insights to offer into the histories of religion during the First World War. (Please refer in your answer to more than one war front i.e. you may include the powers fighting on the Western Front but are expected to move beyond this too.) Please use the material below. At least 8 sources.
Other possibly useful material: General:
John Horne (ed.), A Companion to World War One (Chichester: Wiley-Blackwell, 2010)
Adrian Gregory, A War of Peoples. 1914-1919 (Oxford: OUP, 2014),.
Lawrence Sondhaus, World War One: the global revolution (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2011), chs. 8, 10 & 11.
David Reynolds, The Long Shadow: The Great War and the Twentieth Century (London: Simon & Schuster, 2013).
Adam Tooze, The Deluge: The Great War and the Remaking of the Global Order, 1916-1931 (London: Allen Lane, 2014).
John Horne, ‘The Great War at its centenary’, in Jay Winter (ed.) The Cambridge History of the First World War, vol. 3, Civil Society (Cambridge & New York, Cambridge University Press, 2014), pp.618-39.
Combatant morale / general attitudes to the war:
William Mulligan, The Great War for Peace (New Haven: Yale, 2014), chp. 6 ‘Great Movements for Peace, 1917’, pp. 180-223. [2 copies in Library]
Alexander Watson & Patrick Porter, ‘Bereaved and aggrieved: combat motivation and the ideology of sacrifice in the First World War’, Historical Research, 83 (2010), pp. 146-64. [very useful comparative article on why men fought, combat motivation and resilience in the trenches]
David Stevenson, 1914-1918: The history of the First World War (London: Penguin, 2005)
Alexander Watson, Ring of Steel: Germany and Austria-Hungary in World War I (New York: Basic Books, 2014).
Loez, André: Between Acceptance and Refusal – Soldiers’ Attitudes Towards War, in: 1914-1918-online. International Encyclopedia of the First World War, ed. by Ute Daniel, Peter Gatrell, Oliver Janz, Heather Jones, Jennifer Keene, Alan Kramer, and Bill Nasson, issued by Freie Universität Berlin, Berlin 2014-10-08. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.15463/ie1418.10461.
Stéphane Audoin-Rouzeau, Annette Becker & Leonard V. Smith, France and the Great War (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2003).
Religion:
Philip Jenkins, The great and holy war : how World War I became a religious crusade (Oxford: Lion Books, 2014). [3 copies in Library]
Patrick J. Houlihan, 2 recent articles (2015) entitled ‘The Churches’ and ‘Religious Mobilization and Popular Belief’ in 1914-18 online http://encyclopedia.1914-1918-online.net/home.html
Adrian Gregory, in Jay Winter (ed.) The Cambridge History of the First World War, vol. 3, Civil Society (Cambridge & New York, Cambridge University Press, 2014),
Jay Winter, Sites of memory, sites of mourning: the Great War in European cultural history (Cambridge, 1995).
Annette Becker, War and Faith. The religious imagination in France, 1914-1930 (Oxford: Berg, 1998).
G. Barry, The Disarmament of Hatred: Marc Sangnier, French Catholicism and the legacy of the First World War (Basingstoke: Palgrave Macmillan, 2012).
Edward Madigan, Faith under Fire. Anglican Army chaplains and the Great War (Palgrave Macmillan, 2011).
Michael Snape, God and the British soldier : religion and the British Army in the First and Second World Wars (London; Routledge, 2005).
John Pollard, Benedict XV: the pope of peace (London: Continuum, 2005).
Some internet-based resources on the First World War.
Searching on the internet for a topic such as this is overwhelming. Guidance below:
1914-1918-online. International Encyclopedia of the First World War, ed. by Ute Daniel, Peter Gatrell, Oliver Janz, Heather Jones, Jennifer Keene, Alan Kramer, and Bill Nasson, issued by Freie Universität Berlin, Berlin 2015-11-02.http://encyclopedia.1914-1918-online.net/home/
This is the most up-to-date . For list of dependable war-related websites see http://www.1914-1918-online.net/First_World_War_Websites/index.html
The World War One Centenary Site. http://ww1centenary.oucs.ox.ac.uk/
Up-to-date blogs and short essays on a various range of topic from leading active historians of the First World War, including younger scholars.
Century Ireland – co-production between Boston College and RTE: http://www.rte.ie/centuryireland/ Coverage of Irish and European events relating to the period 1912-23 with weekly ‘news’ updates from 1916.

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