insrtructions:For writing, the same basic rules apply: keep it simple by sticking to key words and general ideas aboutwhich you can expand upon later, limit your essay to 3-5 main ideas, and clearly state your thesis/
argument. When developing a outline for an essay, you can start from the outline and develop it into a
working essay. After you have the key words, start to build each section with research and your own
ideas. Eventually, you will have a well-structured, clear essay.
I. Introduction
A. Attention getter—pull the audience in with something interesting (a story, interesting stats, a quotation,
etc.)
B. Establish credibility/build relationship with the audience—why are you speaking on this
topic?
C. Introduction of topic—give them a brief glimpse at what you are talking about, maybe some
background info. that they need for the speech.
D. Thesis statement: one clear sentence that previews all your main points in the appropriate order.
(transition: one complete sentence that makes the transition to the next part of the speech)
II. (Main point statement) One clear statement that tells the audience what this section is about.
A. Subpoint (that supports the above main point; this is just for form—you have to decide
how many subpoints and sub-subpoints that you have in each section
1. Sub-subpoint (that supports the above subpoint)
a. Support material (that supports the above subpoint; examples, sources)
b. Support material
2. Sub-subpoint
a. Support material
b. Support material
c. Support material
B. Subpoint
C. Subpoint
(transition: )
III. (Main point statement) One clear statement that tells the audience what this section is about.
A. Subpoint
1. Sub-subpoint
a. Support material
b. Support material
2. Sub-subpoint
a. Support material
b. Support material
B. Subpoint
1. Sub-subpoint
2. Sub-subpoint
C. Subpoint
(transition: )
IV. (Main point statement) One clear statement that tells the audience what this section is
about.
A. Subpoint
1. Sub-subpoint
a. Support material
2. Sub-subpoint
B. Subpoint
C. Subpoint
(transition: )
V. Conclusion
A. Summary (what do you want the audience to remember after the speech is over?)
1.
2.
3.
B. Closer—you need to have a strong ending. It often works well to refer back to your attention
getter, to end with a strong quotation, to create a strong image, etc.

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