Introduction and Geologic Setting/Geologic Overview of Ohio
Complete the assignment in the attached MS Word document titled “OhioGeology+SiteSettingSP16.”

You are to complete this assignment INDIVIDUALLY using your own words and submit it online as an attachment. Note that it will go through the “Turnitin” plagiarism detection analysis. This will show a match of some percentage due to the questions being the same, and it may be difficult to avoid re-using some phrases, but you should avoid using extensive blocks of quoted text. You may talk with your fellow group members about the assignment, but do your own work (i.e., write your answers yourself and do not share them with anybody else). If English is not your first language, be careful about using automatic translation software like “Googlefish” — such programs often translate geological terms into unrecognizable gibberish.

For the first week’s assignment complete the following tasks:
1) Using the attached references, “GeoFacts 13: The Geology of Ohio – The Precambrian (Hansen, 1997) and “Ohio’s Surface Rocks and Sediments” (Coogan, 1996), summarize the geologic history of Ohio by filling in the boxes in the table below. In addition, you may find other useful references through the Ohio Department of Natural Resources Division of the Geological Survey (http://geosurvey.ohiodnr.gov/publications-maps-data/publications-home or http://geosurvey.ohiodnr.gov/educational-resources/education-home Your summaries should include the kind of rocks being deposited, what kind of sedimentary environments were dominant, general climatic conditions, and whether or not there were mountain-building or other deformational events occurring at each time (and if so, was the mountain-building going on in Ohio or in nearby states?). See how much you can complete simply by studying the geologic map and cross-section first, then check yourself by looking in the description of Ohio’s geologic history provided in Geological Survey Educational Leaflet 20: Ohio’s Geological Walk through Time.
Eon Period Historical Summary
Cenozoic The Quaternary (Pleistocene to Recent)

The Tertiary

(Note: there is little evidence of what was occurring in Ohio during the Mesozoic and most of the Tertiary? Why is the record for these periods missing?)

Mesozoic Triassic, Jurassic, Cretaceous
Paleozoic Permian

Pennsylvanian

Mississippian

Devonian

Silurian
Ordovician
Cambrian
Precambrian

2) Read “GeoFacts 11: Rocks and Minerals Mined in Ohio and Their Uses” (Wolfe, 2014), and compile a list of Ohio’s most important rock and mineral resources and how each is used below. One and half page.

3) Make a locality map for your Site Investigation Project. First you will need to download and Install Google Earth Pro version from this web site: http://www.google.com/earth/download/gep/agree.html
a. After installing Google Earth Pro, download the state geologic maps for Ohio and West Virginia from this web site: http://mrdata.usgs.gov/geology/state/
b. The maps are available in .kmz format. After downloading them you should only have to click on the .kmz files and they should open in GoogleEarth Pro.
c. After opening them in GoogleEarth Pro you will notice that the map layers are “opaque” so that you can no longer see the underlying topography and satellite imagery. To fix this, you will have to expand the maps in the table of contents in the panel on the left side of the Google Earth interface to show all the map units as a list. You can then right-click on each individual different map unit on the map and click “Properties” (on the pc version). This will open a pop-up window where you can edit the map properties. Go to the “Style, Color” tab and for the fill note that you can adjust the transparency. I generally prefer a transparency somewhere in the range 50% to 65%. Adjust the transparency of your map units so that you can see the underlying layers.
d. Once you have the map view set up as you wish with the view on-screen that you want, you can save the view as a jpg image under File? Save ? Save Image. You can now import this image below. Note: You should import this image as Figure 1 in your write-up of the Introduction and Geologic Setting for your Site Investigation Report. You may also decide that you want to create an inset map at a larger scale that illustrates the regional setting more clearly.
The Tertiary

(Note: there is little evidence of what was occurring in Ohio during the Mesozoic and most of the Tertiary? Why is the record for these periods missing?)

Mesozoic Triassic, Jurassic, Cretaceous
Paleozoic Permian

Pennsylvanian

Mississippian

Devonian

Silurian
Ordovician
Cambrian
Precambrian

2) Read “GeoFacts 11: Rocks and Minerals Mined in Ohio and Their Uses” (Wolfe, 2014), and compile a list of Ohio’s most important rock and mineral resources and how each is used below.

3) Makea locality map for your Site Investigation Project. First you will need to download and Install Google Earth Pro version from this web site:http://www.google.com/earth/download/gep/agree.html
a. After installing Google Earth Pro, download the state geologic maps for Ohio and West Virginia from this web site: http://mrdata.usgs.gov/geology/state/
b. The maps are available in .kmz format. After downloading them you should only have to click on the .kmz files and they should open in GoogleEarth Pro.
c. After opening them in GoogleEarth Pro you will notice that the map layers are “opaque” so that you can no longer see the underlying topography and satellite imagery. To fix this, you will have to expand the maps in the table of contents in the panel on the left side of the Google Earth interface to show all the map units as a list. You can then right-click on each individual different map unit on the map and click “Properties” (on the pc version). This will open a pop-up window where you can edit the map properties. Go to the “Style, Color” tab and for the fill note that you can adjust the transparency. I generally prefer a transparency somewhere in the range 50% to 65%. Adjust the transparency of your map units so that you can see the underlying layers.
d. Once you have the map view set up as you wish with the view on-screen that you want, you can save the view as a jpg image under File? Save ? Save Image. You can now import this image below. Note: You should import this image as Figure 1 in your write-up of the Introduction and Geologic Setting for your Site Investigation Report. You may also decide that you want to create an inset map at a larger scale that illustrates the regional setting more clearly.