Paper topic: 4. On Private Property: Is there a natural right to private property? Some philosophers, for example, John Locke, advocate the view that the right to private property is natural, and indeed fundamental to many other individual rights and freedoms. Other authors (such as F. A. Hayek [see the articles on Hayek under Supplemental Reading in the Required Reading content item in Unit III of the course ]) argue that property rights are not natural, but rather are based upon the social advantages that result from a system of recognizing and enforcing private property. Still other authors, for example, Karl Marx, want to abolish property altogether (at least, property in the means of production). Critically discuss the idea of private property, and drawing on the views of at least two of the authors we have studied in the course, indicate which view you find most compelling. Defend your answer in the most fundamental way you can.

Final Paper: Part I: Title, Introductory Paragraph, Outline of Paper, and List of Possible Sources

This is due at the beginning of the last week of class. Part 1 is worth 5 points, weighted at 5% of your course grade.

Part I includes the following elements:

Paper Title: Come up with a phrase that gives the reader a snapshot of what you will say in the paper. Tip: Don’t use “Final Paper” as your title!

Introductory Paragraph: This should include the following items:

The “Hook”: Opening sentence should capture the reader’s attention and interest.

Basic background or introductory information: This can be accomplished two or three sentences. This section informs the reader why this topic is worth reading and thinking about.

Thesis Statement: This can appear anywhere in the introductory paragraph, but it is usually the final or second-to-last sentence in the first paragraph. It is important to remember the following points:

Your thesis is NOT the same thing as the topic of the paper.
The thesis states your position on an issue or topic in question.
A satisfactory thesis is both specific and significant:

Remember that you are writing a paper of somewhere between 1500 and 2000 words; you cannot attempt to cover everything there is to be said about any major philosophical topic. Stay within the narrow focus set out by the essay prompt.

A significant thesis says something with which some intelligent readers may disagree. A thesis that states something obvious or that is a commonsense truism is not significant.

Note: You are not locked into a topic or a thesis at this point. You may switch topics, with instructor approval, up to 48 hours prior to the due date deadline with no penalty.

Outline of Main Points: This can be very rough and very brief. Your outline will depend on the particular topic you choose and the particular style of exposition that works best for you.

Here are two samples of a basic outline format you may use. Sample A [basic] or Sample B [detailed].

The main point here is to lay out your thinking on the topic from the perspectives in question. The particular format is secondary. You need not follow exactly the structure of either of the samples above. However, they are samples for a reason.

List of possible sources: This can be a “working” list; you may end up using only some of these and adding others. The purpose here is just to get you started on the research. You should cite at least three sources outside of the course textbook and include at least one citation from the textbook.

List of Possible Sources: Don’t worry about formatting here or presenting a complete list. Consider this as a “work in progress.” You may include this list on the same page as the introductory paragraph.

To submit Part I of your Final Paper for Turnitin review and grading, do the following:

Click the link above, “Final Paper: Part I.” Then click the Submit button next to the name of the Assignment. Once you have clicked on the link, scroll down and choose the appropriate paper item submission method from the drop down menu and fill in the remaining required fields. (Please use the naming convention “WKXAssgn+first initial+last name” as the Submission Title.)

Next, click on the Browse button. Find the document you saved as “WKXAssgn+first initial+last name.doc” and click Open. Then click on the Upload button at the bottom of the page. You will then see a screen where you may review your submission. Once you have finished reviewing your submission, click on the Submit button. Finally, you will see a screen that will indicate your paper was submitted successfully.

Here is the list of possible paper topics for this assignment: FINAL PAPER TOPICS

Final Paper: Part II: This is your completed final version of the paper, revised or continued from the introduction and thesis statement submitted in Part 1. Include everything from Part 1, and then build on that to construct your final draft. Part II is due on the last day of class; it is worth 15 points, weighted at 15% of your course grade.

Here are the main things to remember:

Original Thesis: Have a clear, specific, and significant thesis, and state it clearly and early in the paper. The thesis should be your original and considered position or stand on an issue central to the selected topic of your paper.

Supporting Argument(s): A supporting argument is a set of reasons or evidence in favor of the thesis: Why should the reader accept (or even listen to) your side of things? Why should your thesis be accepted as true?

Objections and Replies: First, bring forward any important objections that may be seen as compelling against your view and show why they are not so. If you have a significant thesis, there will be at least one important counterargument in opposition to the view you support, or at least one possible refutation of your supporting argument(s). Next, reply to any objection, counterargument or attempted refutation of your view. If you leave an objection or counterargument unanswered, it severely weakens your thesis.

Summarizing Conclusion: Provide a very brief summary of the argument(s) in support of your thesis, and repeat the thesis here in an expanded form (expanded from having taken it through the various analyses and considerations carried out in the paper). Leave the reader with a sense of learning something and wanting more. At least remind the reader why it has been worth the time to read your paper.

Proofread for writing mechanics and effective style: It needs no saying that close adherence to rules regarding proper grammar, citation and document formatting, and so on, as well as stylistic ideals such as general readability and effective style, must always be in the back of your mind when completing your final draft for submission.

To submit Part II of your Final Paper for Turnitin review and grading, do the following:

Click the link above, “Final Paper: Part II. Then click the Submit button next to the name of the Assignment. Once you have clicked on the link, scroll down and choose the appropriate paper item submission method from the drop down menu and fill in the remaining required fields. (Please use the naming convention “WKXAssgn+first initial+last name” as the Submission Title.)

Next, click on the Browse button. Find the document you saved as “WKXAssgn+first initial+last name.doc” and click Open. Then click on the Upload button at the bottom of the page. You will then see a screen where you may review your submission. Once you have finished reviewing your submission, click on the Submit button. Finally, you will see a screen that will indicate your paper was submitted successfully.

Finally: Don’t forget to review the FINAL PAPER RUBRIC before submitting to ensure that you have fulfilled the criteria for this assignment to the best of your ability. You will also be able to see the rubric by clicking on the “View Rubric” button on the submission page.

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