Professional task briefing paper (juvenile, Crime and Justice)/400684­Juvenile Crime and Justice Autumn 2016Unit Name Session
400684­Juvenile Crime and Justice Autumn 2016
LEARNING GUIDE
School of Social Sciences and Psychology
Please read this document and the accompanying SSAPguide very carefully for everything you need to know about the unit.
If you need help, check both (and your unit vUWS site) first. If you still need help, please contact us as per Section 2.1 of the SSAPguide.
Unit Weekly Schedule Follows on next page for your convenience
Section 1: Unit Information
• Unit code and name
• Unit coordinator
• Credit points
• Teaching session
• Welcome and key contacts
• Consultation arrangements
• Requirements other than those listed below
• Improvements made recently to unit
• Delivery: How unit is delivered
• Attendance requirements
• Textbook
• Essential readings
• Other resources
• Referencing requirements
Section 2: Assessment Information
• Course learning outcomes
• Unit learning outcomes
• How unit outcomes relate to course outcomes
• Assessment summary
• Assessment details: Full details for each assessment item
Section 3: Learning and Teaching Activities See Page 2
Section 4: Learning Resources See Section 1 for Texbook, Readings etc.
• Literacy and/or numeracy resources
Section 5: Expectations Of and By You See SSAPguide
UNIT REQUIREMENTS
Internet Access: You must have internet access for this unit, preferably high speed broadband (or use University facilities)
vUWS:  You must access the unit vUWS site at least twice a week to check for any new content or announcements
iPad: Owning an iPad is strongly recommended, as some units are optimised for iPad
Western Sydney University Learning Guide 1 of 16
Unit Weekly Schedule (Link to Handbook and timetable for unit: http://handbook.uws.edu.au/hbook/unit.aspx?unit=400684)
Week Starts Lecture Tutorial Reading Assessment
1
22/02/2016
Face-to-face lecture:  The
Minimum age of criminal
responsibility
No face­to­face tutorials
Weijers, I and Grisso, T 2009, ‘Criminal responsibility of
adolescents: Youth as junior citizenship’, in J Junger­Tas
and F Dunker (eds.), Reforming Juvenile Justice, SpringerVerlag,
New York, pp. 45­67.
2
29/03/2016
Face-to-face lecture: Young
people and the media
Face-to-face tutorial: Media
representations of young
people and crime
Mills, M and Keddie, A, 2010, ‘Cultural reductionism and
the media: Polarising discourses around schools,
violence and masculinity in an age of terror’, Oxford
Education Review, vol. 36, no. 4, pp. 427­444.
3
7/03/2016
Face-to-face lecture: Dimensions
of youth crime
Face-to-face tutorial: Drift
and juvenile offending
Richards, K 2011, ‘What makes juvenile offenders
different from adult offenders?, Trends and Issues in
Criminal Justice, No. 409, Australian Institute of
Criminology, Canberra.
4
14/03/2016
Face-to-face lecture: Historical
perspectives on juvenile crime
governance
Face-to-face tutorial:
Welfarism and Aboriginality
Carrington, K and Pereira, M 2009, ‘The emergence of
juvenile justice’, in Offending Youth: Sex, Crime and
Justice, The Federation Press, Sydney, pp. 22­36.
5
21/03/2016
Face-to-face lecture: The
contemporary juvenile justice
system in NSW
Face-to-face tutorial: Reading
young offender legislation
Muncie, J 2006, ‘Governing young people: Coherence
and contradiction in contemporary youth justice’, Critical
Social Policy, vol. 26, no. 4, pp. 770­793.
6
28/03/2016/03/2016
Face-to-face lecture: The
politics of ‘risk’ and the new
governance of youth crime
Face-to-face tutorial: ‘Risky
business’: Classifying youth as
a ‘dangerous class’
Turnbull, G and Spence J 2011, ‘What’s at risk? The
proliferation of risk across child and youth policy in
England’, Journal of Youth Studies, vol. 14, no. 8, pp. 939­
959.
Assessment 1: Essay due
before 11:59pm on Monday
28/03/2016
7
04/04/2016
Face-to-face lecture: The Young
Offenders Act 1997
Face-to-face tutorial: Youth
diversion and restorative
justice
Bolitho, J 2012, ‘Restorative justice: The ideals and
realities of conferencing for young people’, Critical
Criminology, vol. 20, no. 1, pp. 61­78.
8
11/04/2016
SESSION BREAK NO LECTURES OR TUTORIALS
9
18/04/2016
Face-to-face lecture: Youth in
detention
Face-to-face tutorial: ‘Kids
doing time’
Halsey, M 2007, ‘On confinement: Residents and inmate
perspectives of secure care and imprisonment’,
Probation Journal, vol. 54, no. 4, pp. 338­367.
10
25/04/2016
Face-to-face lecture: Precaution
and the securitisation of young
people’s lives
Face-to-face tutorial: The
militarisation of young
people’s lives
Taylor, E 2013, ‘Surveillance schools: A new era in
education’, in Security, Discipline and Control in
Contemporary Education, Palgrave Macmillan,
Hampshire, pp. 15­39.
11
2/05/2016
Pre-recorded online lecture: The
regulation of young people in
public space
Face-to-face tutorial: Public
space, everyone’s space?
McAuliffe, C and Iveson, K 2011, ‘Art and crime (an other
things beside..): Conceptualising graffiti in the city’,
Geography Compass, vol. 5, no. 3, pp. 128­143.
Assessment 2: Professional task
(briefing paper) due before
11:59pm on Monday
02/05/2016
12
9/05/2016
Pre-recorded online lecture:
Policing and young people
Face-to-face tutorial:
Youth/police relations
White, R 2009, ‘Ethnic diversity and differential policing
in Australia: The good, the bad and the ugly’,
International Migration Integration, vol. 10, no. 4, pp.
359­375.
13
16/05/2016
Pre-recorded online lecture:
Living in abject or demonised
spaces and the struggle for
subjectivity
Face-to-face tutorial:
Gangsta culture in the ‘Durty
South’
Savage, G and Hickey­Moody, A 2010, ‘Global flows as
gendered cultural pedagogies: Learning gansta in the
‘Durty South’, Critical Studies in Education, vol. 51, no. 3,
pp. 277­293.
14
23/05/2016
No lecture this week. No tutorial this week.
Assessment 3: Poster with
explanation due before 11:59pm
on Friday 27/05/2016
15
30/05/2016 STUVAC Student exam study vacation
16­18
06/06/2016/06/2016
FORMAL EXAMINATION PERIOD
Western Sydney University Learning Guide 2 of 16
SECTION ONE: Unit Information
Unit Number 400684
Unit Name 400684­Juvenile Crime and Justice
Unit Coordinator Ana Rodas
Credit Points 10
Session Autumn 2016
Introduction
Welcome to Juvenile Crime and Justice!
This unit develops an understanding of the complexity of juvenile crime by addressing
the historical, political, cultural and socio­economic factors associated with youth crime,
constructions of youth, and, governmental strategies for regulating and preventing
juvenile crime. An inter­disciplinary framework is used to develop a critical appreciation
of the impacts of the regulation of particular youth groups that are over­represented in
the juvenile justice system, including Aboriginal youth and other racial/ethnic minority
youth. Lastly, the unit will critically assess a range of official interventions for working
with young people within the juvenile justice system.
Key Contact:
Unit Coordinator:
Dr Ana Rodas
Email: a.rodas@westernsydney.edu.au
Phone: (02) 4736 0133
Consultation
Consultation:
I hold office hours once a week on each campus, feel free to arrange an appointment to
come see me. If you’re based at the Bankstown campus you can make an appointment
to meet with me on Wednesdays in 1.1.61. If based at Kingswood, you can make an
appointment to see me on Thursdays in P.G. 47. It is important that you make an
appointment before coming to see me. I have a number of commitments and I may not
be in the office or able to see you if you turn up without an appointment.
If you are unable to meet with me on the specified days please email me and we can
discuss an alternative day and time that is mutually convenient.
Improvements
Assessment task three description and marking criteria have been amended to provide
greater guidance and clarity. The pre­recorded online lectures have been moved to the
end of the semester.
Western Sydney University Learning Guide 3 of 16
Requirements
Requirements
Special requirements or materials for unit:
All the assessment items described in this document are compulsory and must be
completed before you are eligible to pass the unit, regardless of how many marks you
accumulate. In addition, to pass the unit, you must obtain a minimum overall mark of
50%, aggregated across all weighted assessments.
Delivery

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