RE: DQ 1
COLLAPSE
According to the Presidential Policy Directive 21, “The nation’s critical infrastructure is diverse and complex”. Considering critical infrastructure emcompasses “distributed networks, varied organizational structures and operating models (including multinational ownership), interdependent functions and systems in both the physical space and cyberspace, and governance constructs that involve multi-level authorities, responsibilities, and regulations” (“Presidential Policy Directive — Critical Infrastructure Security and Resilience”, 2013),
this statement is quite accurate. Securing our nation’s critical infrastructure is a tall task that relies on cooperation among every level of government, including global partnerships. To add to the challenge, the majority of these are owned and operated by the private sector (“NIPP 2013: Partnering for Critical Infrastructure Security and Resilience”, 2013). Not only are the players involved elaborate, but the plans and policies to protect critical infrastructure and promote resilience are involved. An integrated approach in necessary to “Identify, deter, detect, disrupt, and prepare for threats and hazards, reduce vulnerabilities of critical assets, systems, and networks, mitigate the potential consequences to critical infrastructure of incidents or adverse events that do occur” (“NIPP 2013: Partnering for Critical Infrastructure Security and Resilience”, 2013).
Critical infrastructure plays a major role in society as all of society’s essential functions rely on it. A significant threat could produce “catastrophic health effects or mass casualties comparable to those from the use of a weapon of mass destruction” (“Homeland Security Presidential Directive 7 | Homeland Security”, 2015). Additional consequences include the disruption of goods and services, including public health and national safety, as well as the impairment of businesses and economic implications.
As per the Presidential Policy Directive 21, the government is working towards strengthening the security of our critical infrastructure and promoting resilience. For this purpose, resilience means the ability to prepare for and adapt to changing conditions and withstand and recover rapidly from disruptions, including the ability to withstand and recover from deliberate attacks, accidents, or naturally occurring threats or incidents (“Presidential Policy Directive — Critical Infrastructure Security and Resilience”, 2013). The focal points of PPD 21 include: policy- take proactive steps considering all hazards; efforts-reducing vulnerabilities, minimizing consequences, identifying and disrupting threats,and hastening response and recovery efforts, while fostering international partnerships to secure and international critical infrastructure and resources (“Presidential Policy Directive — Critical Infrastructure Security and Resilience”, 2013). In order to carry out these initiatives the government will focus on relationships for a nationally unified effort, information and intelligence exchange, comprehensive assessments of vulnerabilities, and coordinated responses to incidents. Additionally, annual analysis and reports will provide insight.

Homeland Security Presidential Directive 7 | Homeland Security. (2015). Dhs.gov. Retrieved 21
March 2017, from https://www.dhs.gov/homeland-security-presidential-directive-7

NIPP 2013: Partnering for Critical Infrastructure Security and Resilience. (2013). The Department
of Homeland Security. Retrieved 21 March 2017, from
https://www.dhs.gov/sites/default/files/publications/National-Infrastructure-Protection-Plan2013-508.pdf

Presidential Policy Directive — Critical Infrastructure Security and Resilience. (2017).
whitehouse.gov. Retrieved 21 March 2017, from
https://obamawhitehouse.archives.gov/the-press-office/2013/02/12/presidential-policy-dir
ctive-critical-infrastructure-security-and-resil

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