WWeellll–bbeeiinngg Our sense of satisfaction with our everyday experience.
SSyymmppaatthheettiicc NNeerrvvoouuss
SSyysstteemm ((SSNNSS))
The division of the autonomic nervous system that is involved in preparing the body to respond to threats
by activating the organs and the glands in the endocrine system.
PPaarraassyymmppaatthheettiicc
NNeerrvvoouuss SSyysstteemm
((PPNNSS)),,
The division of the autonomic nervous system that is involved in resting, digesting, relaxing, and
recovering.
AArroouussaall Changes in bodily sensations, including increased blood pressure, heart rate, perspiration, and
respiration.
AAmmyyggddaallaa The region in the limbic system that is primarily responsible for regulating our perceptions of, and
reactions to, aggression and fear.
BBaassiicc EEmmoottiioonnss (Anger, contempt, disgust, fear, happiness, sadness, and surprise) are emotions that are based primarily
on the arousal produced by the SNS and that do not require much cognitive processing.
SSeeccoonnddaarryy EEmmoottiioonnss Emotions that provide us with more complex feelings about our social worlds and that are more
cognitively based.
MMiissaattttrriibbuuttiioonn ooff
AArroouussaall
Occurs when people incorrectly label the source of the arousal that they are experiencing.
SSttrreessss The physical and psychological reactions that occur whenever we believe that the demands of a situation
threaten our ability to respond to the threat.
PPoosstt–ttrraauummaattiicc SSttrreessss
DDiissoorrddeerr ((PPTTSSDD))
A medical syndrome that includes symptoms of anxiety, sleeplessness, nightmares, and social
withdrawal.
GGeenneerraall AAddaappttaattiioonn
SSyynnddrroommee
The three distinct phases of physiological change that occur in response to long-term stress: alarm,
resistance, and exhaustion.
HHPPAA AAxxiiss A physiological response to stress involving interactions among the hypothalamus, the pituitary gland,
and the adrenal glands.
CCoorrttiissooll A stress hormone that releases sugars into the blood to help prepare the body to respond to threat.
Social Psychology
By Bo Bennett, PhD
LLeessssoonn ##33:: SSoocciiaall AAffffeecctt TTeerrmmss aanndd DDeePPnniittiioonnss
Lesson_3_Terms_and_Definitions https://www.dowellwebtools.com/tools/oc/Bo/SocialPsych?print…
1 of 2 1/27/16, 7:04 AM
DDaaiillyy HHaasssslleess Our everyday interactions with the environment that are essentially negative.
FFiigghhtt–oorr–FFlliigghhtt
RReessppoonnssee
An emotional and behavioral reaction to stress that increases the readiness for action.
TTeenndd–aanndd–BBeeffrriieenndd
RReessppoonnssee
A behavioral reaction to stress that involves activities designed to create social networks that provide
protection from threats.
DDeepprreessssiioonn An affective disorder in which people experience sadness, low self-esteem, negative thoughts,
pessimism, and apathy.
AAnnxxiieettyy A psychological disorder that may be accompanied by a number of physical symptoms, including
diarrhea, upset stomach, sweaty hands, shortness of breath, poor concentration, and general agitation.
SSeellff–rreegguullaattiioonn The process of setting goals and using our cognitive and affective capacities to reach those goals.
OOppttiimmiissmm A general tendency to expect positive outcomes.
SSeellff–eeffPPccaaccyy The belief in our ability to carry out actions that produce desired outcomes.
Lesson_3_Terms_and_Definitions https://www.dowellwebtools.com/tools/oc/Bo/SocialPsych?print…
2 of 2 1/27/16, 7:04 AM

http://2012books.lardbucket.org/books/social-psychology-principles/s06-social-affect.html

https://www.dowellwebtools.com/tools/ps/Bo/SocialPsych/Yq7rMBOsiq

Choose any one of the questions in the “Exercises and Critical Thinking” section of chapter 3 and write a one-page paper on it. Use APA formatting, and include at least one scholarly source other than the textbook.

For full credit:

Meet the objectives of the assignment as outlined in the question you choose.
Demonstrate a strong understanding of the material.
Demonstrate quality, scholarly writing.
Use and cite source(s).
Complete the assignment on time.

=====

for the reference page center the word “References” (note case and spelling).
! A major part of our everyday experiences?particularly those behaviors that have substantial
impact on our health and happiness?is the result of affect. Affect helps us engage in
behaviors that are appropriate to our perceptions of a social situation.
! Our emotions are determined in part by responses of the sympathetic nervous system (SNS)
and the limbic system (particularly the amygdala). The outcome of the activation of the SNS
is the experience of arousal.
! The basic emotions of anger, contempt, disgust, fear, happiness, sadness, and surprise are
expressed and experienced consistently across many different cultures.
! There are also a large number of secondary emotions, such as guilt, shame, and
embarrassment, that provide us with more complex feelings about our social worlds and
that are more cognitively based.
! There are at least some differences in the experience of emotion between men and women
and across cultures.
! We use our mood states as information to help us determine our current situation and our
well-being. Mood states inFuence information processing through their effects on
processing Fuency.
! In some cases, it may be difHcult to accurately determine the source of the arousal we are
experiencing, and we may misattribute the arousal.
! Although most people generally experience a sense of everyday well-being, negative affect,
particularly stress, can disrupt these feelings.
! The experience of prolonged stress creates an increase in general arousal in the SNS and
physiological changes through the HPA axis.
! People who have recently experienced extreme negative situations experience stress, but
everyday minor hassles can also create stress.
Social Psychology
By Bo Bennett, PhD
LLeessssoonn ##33:: SSoocciiaall AAffffeecctt KKeeyy PPooiinnttss
Lesson_3_Key_Points https://www.dowellwebtools.com/tools/oc/Bo/SocialPsych?prin…
1 of 2 1/27/16, 6:56 AM
! Not all people experience and respond to stress in the same way, and these differences can
be important. One difference in response is between the Hght-or-Fight response and the
tend-and-befriend response.
! Depression and anxiety are largely socially determined, through a lack of adequate social
interactions and the inability to meet standards imposed by others.
! Suppressing or ignoring our problems is usually not successful because it takes effort and
does not make them go away. It is healthier to express our negative thoughts and feelings,
either to ourselves or to others.
! Being able to effectively regulate our emotions is a skill that has important and positive
consequences.
! Positive thinking, including optimism, hardiness, and self-efHcacy, is associated with a wide
variety of positive effects on our health.
! One difHculty that people face when trying to improve their happiness is that they may not
always know what will make them happy.
! Building effective lives requires us to use our cognitive resources to avoid engaging in
pleasurable but health-threatening behaviors.
Lesson_3_Key_Points https://www.dowellwebtools.com/tools/oc/Bo/SocialPsych?prin…
2 of 2 1/27/16, 6:56 AM

! A major part of our everyday experiences?particularly those behaviors that have substantial
impact on our health and happiness?is the result of affect. Affect helps us engage in
behaviors that are appropriate to our perceptions of a social situation.
! Our emotions are determined in part by responses of the sympathetic nervous system (SNS)
and the limbic system (particularly the amygdala). The outcome of the activation of the SNS
is the experience of arousal.
! The basic emotions of anger, contempt, disgust, fear, happiness, sadness, and surprise are
expressed and experienced consistently across many different cultures.
! There are also a large number of secondary emotions, such as guilt, shame, and
embarrassment, that provide us with more complex feelings about our social worlds and
that are more cognitively based.
! There are at least some differences in the experience of emotion between men and women
and across cultures.
! We use our mood states as information to help us determine our current situation and our
well-being. Mood states inFuence information processing through their effects on
processing Fuency.
! In some cases, it may be difHcult to accurately determine the source of the arousal we are
experiencing, and we may misattribute the arousal.
! Although most people generally experience a sense of everyday well-being, negative affect,
particularly stress, can disrupt these feelings.
! The experience of prolonged stress creates an increase in general arousal in the SNS and
physiological changes through the HPA axis.
! People who have recently experienced extreme negative situations experience stress, but
everyday minor hassles can also create stress.
Social Psychology
By Bo Bennett, PhD
LLeessssoonn ##33:: SSoocciiaall AAffffeecctt KKeeyy PPooiinnttss
Lesson_3_Key_Points https://www.dowellwebtools.com/tools/oc/Bo/SocialPsych?prin…
1 of 2 1/27/16, 6:56 AM
! Not all people experience and respond to stress in the same way, and these differences can
be important. One difference in response is between the Hght-or-Fight response and the
tend-and-befriend response.
! Depression and anxiety are largely socially determined, through a lack of adequate social
interactions and the inability to meet standards imposed by others.
! Suppressing or ignoring our problems is usually not successful because it takes effort and
does not make them go away. It is healthier to express our negative thoughts and feelings,
either to ourselves or to others.
! Being able to effectively regulate our emotions is a skill that has important and positive
consequences.
! Positive thinking, including optimism, hardiness, and self-efHcacy, is associated with a wide
variety of positive effects on our health.
! One difHculty that people face when trying to improve their happiness is that they may not
always know what will make them happy.
! Building effective lives requires us to use our cognitive resources to avoid engaging in
pleasurable but health-threatening behaviors.
Lesson_3_Key_Points https://www.dowellwebtools.com/tools/oc/Bo/SocialPsych?prin…
2 of 2 1/27/16, 6:56 AM

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *