the colonial code of relations

the colonial code of relations

“the colonial code of relations” taken from various sources, including newspapers, magazines, counselling and historical textbooks, documents from counselling and mental health agencies, the DSM-IV, and other professional texts or brochures.

You are encouraged to draw from poetry, biographies of women, philosophical writings, and non-therapeutic literature to access the broader lived experience of women dealing with oppression.

QUESTION:Identify the ways in which Indigenous women respond to (e.g., resist, speak back to, circumvent, avoid, contest, refuse to be content with) formulations of the colonial code that portray them as ill, broken, pathological, passive victims, lacking information, falsely conscious, unconsciously oppressed, in need of assistance or enlightening, or in other deficit categories.

Refer to as many of the course readings (required and supplementary), and other resources that you find applicable. Begin by outlining the four or five examples, and then develop each one using relevant sources to explain what the codes are and how Indigenous women respond to them.

SOURCES FROM COURSE:I copied and pasted them so many may be repeated!!
• Smith, Andrea. (2005). Conquest: Sexual violence and American Indian genocide. Cambridge, MA: South End Press. Chapter 1: Sexual violence as a tool of colonization.
• Ethnologue. (2009). Languages of Canada [maps].
• Graveline, Fyre Jean. (1998). Revitalizing a traditional worldview. In Circle works: Transforming Eurocentric consciousness (pp. 49–69). Halifax: Fernwood.
• Smith, Andrea. (2005). Conquest: Sexual violence and American Indian genocide. Cambridge, MA: South End Press. Chapter 2: Boarding school abuses and the case for reparations.
• Richardson, Catherine. Colonial container of social relations [diagram].
• Richardson, Catherine. Questionnaire to assess psychological and physical safety and the available scope of movement.
• Native Women’s Association of Canada (NWAC). (2007). Violence against Aboriginal women and girls: An issue paper prepared for the National Aboriginal Women’s Summit.
• Razack, Sharene. (2000). Gendered racial violence and spatialized justice: The murder of Pamela George. Canadian Journal of Law and Society, 15(2), 92–130.
• Anderson, Kim. (2001). A recognition of being: Reconstructing Native womanhood. Toronto, ON: Sumach Press. Chapter 7: Foundations of resistance.
• Coates, Linda, & Wade, Allan. (2004). Telling it like it isn’t: Obscuring perpetrator responsibility for violent crime. Discourse & Society, 15(5): 3–30.
• Anderson, Kim. (2001). A recognition of being: Reconstructing Native womanhood. Toronto, ON: Sumach Press. Chapter 8: Acts of resistance.
• Smith, Andrea. (2005). Conquest: Sexual violence and American Indian genocide. Cambridge, MA: South End Press. Chapter 4: Better dead than pregnant (pp. 79–107).
• Todd, Nick, & Wade, Allan. (1994). Domination, deficiency and psychotherapy. Calgary Participator (Fall).
• Bush, Allister, Collings, Sunny, Tamasese, Kiwi, &Waldegrave, Charles. (2005). Samoan and psychiatrists’ perspectives on the self: Qualitative comparison. Australian and New Zealand Journal of Psychiatry, 39, 621–626.
• Todd, Nick, & Wade, Allan. (2007). [Excerpt from:] Agents to objects: How the language of effects conceals responses to and responsibility for violent acts. (unpublished)
• Smith, Andrea. (2005). Conquest: Sexual violence and American Indian genocide. Cambridge, MA: South End Press. Chapter 6. Spiritual appropriation as sexual violence.
• Waldegrave, Charles. (2005). “Just Therapy” with families on low incomes. Child Welfare League of America, 84(2), 265–309.
• Anderson, Kim. (2001). The construction of a negative identity. Chapter 6 in A recognition of being: Reconstructing Native womanhood. Toronto, ON: Sumach Press.
• Richardson, Catherine, & Wade, Allan. (2008). Taking resistance seriously: A response-based approach to social work in cases of violence against Indigenous women. In Susan Strega& Jeannine Carriere (Eds.), Walking this path together: Anti-racist and anti-oppressive child welfare practice (pp. 204–220). Winnipeg, MB: Fernwood.
• Bott, David. (2001). Towards a family-centred therapy. Postmodern developments in family therapy and the person-centred contribution. Counselling Psychology Quarterly.
• Anderson, Kim. (2001). A recognition of being: Reconstructing Native womanhood. Toronto, ON: Sumach Press.
Chapter 8, Acts of resistance.
Chapter 9, Attitudes of resistance.
• Richardson, Catherine. (2009). Demonstration of a Response-Based Interview by Dr. Cathy Richardson.
• Four operations of language.
• Richardson, Catherine. (2009). Some steps in response-based interviewing.
• Richardson, Catherine. (2009, July). Islands of safety and the social geography of human dignity: A child and mother safety planning initiative for cases of paternal violence in child welfare. Federation of Community Social Services of BC, Research to Practice Network.
• Wade, Allan. (2010). The History of Family Therapy—An Interview with Dr. Allan Wade by Dr. Cathy Richardson.
• White, Michael. (1988). Saying hullo again: The incorporation of the lost relationship in the resolution of grief. Dulwich Centre Newsletter (Spring). Reprinted in C. White & D. Denborough (Eds.), Introducing narrative therapy: A collection of practice-based writings (pp. 17–28). Adelaide: Dulwich Centre Publications, 1998.
• McGrath, Pam, Fox-Young, Stephanie, &Phllips, Emma. (2009). Insights on Aboriginal grief practices from the Northern Territory, Australia.
• Carriere, Jeannine. (2005). The role of connectedness in the health of First Nations adoptees. Paediatrics & Child Health, 10(9), 545–548.
• Culhane, Dara. (2003). Their spirits live within us: Aboriginal women in downtown Eastside Vancouver: Emerging into visibility. Special Issue: Urban American Indian women’s activism. The American Indian Quarterly, 27(3/4), 593–606.
• Anderson, Kim. (2001). A recognition of being: Reconstructing Native womanhood. Toronto, ON: Sumach Press. Chapter 11, Relating to creation.
• Smith, Andrea. (2005). Conquest: Sexual violence and American Indian genocide. Cambridge, MA: South End Press. Chapter 3, Rape of the land.
• Carriere, Jeannine, & Richardson, Catherine. (2009). From longing to belonging: An Indigenous critique of applying attachment theory to work with Indigenous families. In S. McKay, D. Fuchs, & I. Brown (Eds.), Passion for action in child and family services. Regina, SK: Canadian Plains Press.
• Anderson, Kim. (2001). A recognition of being: Reconstructing Native womanhood. Toronto, ON: Sumach Press. Chapter 2: Working with notions of tradition and culture.
• Anderson, Kim. (2001). A recognition of being: Reconstructing Native womanhood. Toronto, ON: Sumach Press. Chapter 10: Our human relations.
• Sinclair, Raven. (2007). Identity lost and found: Lessons from the sixties scoop. First Peoples Child and Family Review, 3(1): 65–82.
• Richardson, Catherine. (2006). Métis Identity Creation and Tactical Responses to Oppression and Racism. Variegations, 2, 56–71.
• Smith, Andrea. (2005). Conquest: Sexual violence and American Indian genocide. Cambridge, MA: South End Press. Chapter 7: Anticolonial responses to gender violence

 

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