When the expression form of connection is used, it means how the upstrokes and the downstrokes are connected-usually somewhere in the middle zone. Should the connections occur in another zone, the writer in all that this particular zone represents is showing particular emphasis. When the expression form of connection is used, it means how the upstrokes and the downstrokes are connected-usually somewhere in the middle zone. Should the connections occur in another zone, the writer in all that this particular zone represents is showing particular emphasis. Since the connecting strokes by nature meet in the middle zone and the middle zone is indicative of the writer’s social relationships, it gives the graphologist strong insight into the writer’s social life. There are four major types of connections: arcade, garland, angular, and thready. Often the graphologist finds more than one form of connection in the same writing. If one form is used more frequently than the others, the writer probably has the qualities reflected by that particular form of connection.

However, although one form may be the dominant one in the writer’s personality, the characteristics of the other forms do exist and play a role in his personality also. When we have two connecting forms (or even more, though it is not frequent) used approximately equally, we say that the writer possesses the personality traits of the two forms in equal proportion. This is arcade writing. There is reserve in the personality, someone who would rather be with nature than with people. Arcade writers are often secretive, have a strong interest in architecture, and are frequently artists. The arcade writer prefers to shut the world out and often puts on a facade. With the arcade connection to protect him, he can make believe that he is someone he really is not. The arcade writer is usually slower in his reactions than most people, especially those who write in garland connections. In writing the arcade, the subject must use an up-down direction, employing extensor muscles-muscles used in extending a limb. The garland writer, on the other hand, uses a down-up direction, employing flexor muscles- muscles used in bending or clenching a limb.

The flexors are stronger than the extensors, and hence it is easier and quicker to write the garland than the arcade. Imagine curved writing with the ends up and the middle down. The major personality trait of the garland writer is a love of peace. Garland writers are fond of pleasure, will always try to find the easy way out, and try to avoid conflicts. They usually have a great deal of charm. Their receptive personalities and willingness to be exposed to whatever may come can be seen by the openness at the top of their letters. They are warm, loving, patient persons and are often found in positions where it is necessary to deal directly with people. They get along well with others and know how to use their charm when it is needed. The writer of the angular connection has a lively, vibrant personality and is alert and competitive. He has a critical mind, and when he starts a job, he finishes it. He is hard and aggressive and can be difficult to get along with-as shown by the angles, which indicate rigidity. He is quick, both physically and mentally.

He will often clash with the person writing the arcade form of connection, since the arcade writer tends to be slower coming to decisions. The writer of the angular connection often loses patience with the arcade writer for his procrastination. The arcade writer, in turn, feels persecuted and badgered for acting in ways that are natural to him. The thready connection speaks for itself. It looks as though the connections were being held together by pieces of thread. This is very quick writing. The thready writer is unsure of both the world and himself, with emphasis on the latter. It is difficult for him to make up his mind, and he would prefer not to be pressed for decisions. This writing often shows hysteria. His writing connections became thready during the Watergate affair, a most sensitive period. Here the middle zone starts at a certain height and dwindles to about the size of a thread as it ends.

This shows powerful intuition, always wiggling out of difficult situations (notice how the form resembles that of a snake). This writer definitely prefers not to commit himself to any definite course of action. Many diplomats write in this threadlike form. As the understanding of the thready connection writer speaks for itself, the following clarification of the other forms should be noted. Really deep, calixlike garlands seem better suited to a deeply rooted impressionability and sentimental conservatism than to dancing and quick progress. But the platter or cup or calix necessarily has a bottom. We must therefore ask how deeply do those new ideas and suggestions sink into the writer’s mind? Does he permit his unconscious to emerge, does he allow “the imponderables” to enter his consciousness? Obviously, the garland writer’s world is the visible, tangible, measurable world; he shuns the mystical, the deep, the abstract. And because he avoids the “depths of life,” we can understand why the garland writer remains young, naive, or as some call it, “immature,” all his life.

"Are you looking for this answer? We can Help click Order Now"

UK BEST WRITING